Monthly Archives: September 2013

A feast of social media know-how

Megan Hubscher presenting at the Sustainability Trust office

Megan Hubscher speaking about how the Sustainability Trust use social media, in their central Wellington showroom/ venue/ office

In the world’s coolest little capital NetSquared Wellington hosted two talks this week. We showcased different approaches to social media as part of a programme of 40 events during the global #SocMedSep themed month.

From the the Sustainability Trust we had Megan Husbscher tell us about they are using to reach out to a broad range of customers, supporters, volunteers and people seeking to have greener lives.

So as not to get tangled in policies and procedures, Megan says the Trust has a philosophy of getting out there and doing it. Their motto is learn as we go.

Reflecting diversity and allowing people across the whole organisation to use social media is what Megan would like to see happening. It’s not as easy as it sounds, as people are busy doing their day jobs.

When asked what makes a good post, Megan said “anything that comes from your heart, that genuinely moves you, will move others.”

Helen Player pointing out sights in Wellington harbour, post talk.

Helen Player from Positively Wellington Tourism sharing the view of Wellington harbour after the #net2welly talk

Getting more people to get out and about in Wellington is the aim of the capital’s tourism agency Positively Wellington Tourism. Talking about their work Digital Marketing Manager Helen Player gave the impression they get to be very creative in how they approach this.

To run with this fresh approach Helen summed up their rules of thumb in these five tips:

  1. Beat print and other newspapers (otherwise you’re too late)
  2. Track what you do
  3. Be relevant – everything has a Wellington angle
  4. Cater for mobile – including any apps
  5. Make it easy to take action.

Competitions are a big thing – theses are used to attract people and encourage them to stay in touch. This included a virtual wishing well that mimicked a infamous fountain in grungy Cuba Street, where people outside the city can win trip. More are coming soon.

It was fantastic that both our #SocMedSep presenters shared fine-grained detail, including statistics.

The two talks were only possible because we had two people step forward from within NetSqaured Wellington willing to help. Thanks to to Justine from Plunket and Eileen from Kites.

We sounded people coming about being able to access personalised advice at a social media surgery. Despite being introduced to the idea by me wearing a medical mask and stethoscope, and wielding a plastic scalpel (though no rubber gloves, just yet!) people seem responsive. We’ll look to organise something before the end of the year.

PS I’ve been appointed one of four global NetSquared regional ambassadors – in this role I’ll support the active groups across region, plus can help if you’d like to set up a group in your town too. THe ambassador role is honorary, though I will be meeting other ambassadors in Washington DC next march, and attend the annual Nonprofit Technology Conference run by NTEN.

Don’t get caught up with making it perfect

Cartoon, punchline: Just click the damn publish butotnWarning: this is something of a limbering up blog post. Some stretching to loosen a muscle dormant for quite some time.

Things have been very busy since I waved good bye to Beth Kanter in May.

Work on 2-3 projects at a time, my part-time role with Community Research, organising NetSquared Wellington events and sundry other distractions have inched there way between me and my blog.

Being an advocate for slowing down and making time for reflection, this hasn’t felt quite right. Where is the time I set aside to quietly shape ill formed ideas into something worthy of discussion? Were my gleanings just rotting away?

The longer I’ve left it, the harder it has been to restart.

Thanks to self proclaimed data nerd chris lysy from fresh spectrum this has changed.

From the twitter flow I fished up a reference to “22 bloggers with advice for researchers and evaluators, illustrated”.

After putting off staring the well structured and creatively presented post – largely because the 22 bloggers manage to share over 10,000 words of insights – I’ve just read it.

Advice from Chi Yan Lam – who is thinking about the intersection of program evaluation, design and social innovation – captures some of the thinking behind why I started blogging in 2004, and still really resonates:

I realized that the blog could be a space for my thinking. Instead of insisting on writing for an audience, I wrote for myself. I guess what this boils down to is this: Blogging is simply a platform. There are many successful models of blogging. The important thing is to make blogging goals consistent with one’s goals. Don’t Emulate. Create.

Cartoon caption: don't get caught up with making it perfectA post on blogging wouldn’t be complete without hearing from the aforementioned Beth ‘blogger extraordinaire’ Kanter, who said to chris:

Look at your blogging time as a form of professional development and a commitment to write something regularly. Don’t get caught up with making it perfect either

I’m don’t want to overdo my mental stretching. I’m feeling warmed up. Keys and finders in sync. I’ll be back. Soon? Soon!